To get the most out of Reclaim Tasks, it helps to understand these important concepts.

There are Tasks and there are Task Events. The mental model to think about is that Tasks represent your needs / todos / etc. Each Task will have one or more Task Event that represent when you'll do the work and appear on the calendar.

Short Tasks usually only have one Task Event (ex: 15-60 minutes), whereas longer Tasks ( > 1h) may be broken up into multiple Task Events.

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Like your schedule, Task Events are fluid. Reclaim understands things are changing all the time and you often are balancing competing priorities. As such, Task Events will adapt as you accept (Yes or Maybe RSVPs) or create overlapping meetings.

To achieve maximum availability, Task Events will also be marked as "free time" ( 🆓 ) as long as you aren't at risk if missing your Task's due date. If you are at risk or overdue, Reclaim defends your time by marking the Task Events "busy" ( 🛡 ).

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The calendar is the source of truth. Reclaim treats the calendar as the source of truth for what work got done and what work needs to be scheduled.

As time passes, Reclaim assumes the work scheduled happened according to the plan, potentially marking a Task as complete. This also means, altering the past can impact your future schedule, as can editing future events.

Similarly, if you delete a historical event that represented an hour of working time yesterday, you will find that a new hour of working time will be scheduled in the future and the Task will no longer be marked as complete.

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Calendar edits affect Task events, not Tasks. Calendar changes impact the schedule, but don't control the overall Task definition. In other words, deleting a Task event doesn't cancel the Task. Similarly, shrinking or expanding the Task event doesn't shrink or expand the Task's duration. To make changes to the Task definition itself, you'll need to use Reclaim's web interface or other integration point, such as Slack or Google Tasks.

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Your Habits play into Task prioritization. You likely have some Habits that you always want to do even before Tasks -- personal stuff like lunch or family time as well as critical work-related habits such as customer support. You can control which ones take priority to fine-tune your schedule.

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